Category Archives: Loving Frank

Loving Frank by Nancy Horan

Loving Frank Discussion

One of my book clubs just finished its discussion of Nancy Horan’s Loving Frank, a historical novel fictionalizing the love affair of Mamah Borthwick Cheney and Frank Lloyd Wright that my book club just loved.

Our first discussion question sparked much conversation as did our final discussion question:

How did Mamah’s relationship with Ellen Key (the Swedish feminist whose work so profoundly influences Mamah) mirror – or differ- from hers with Frank Lloyd Wright?

Will write more about my thoughts on this book later.

Loving Frank discussion

One of my book clubs has just started its discussion of Nancy Horan’s Loving Frank, a historical novel fictionalizing the love affair of Mamah Borthwick Cheney and Frank Lloyd Wright that my book club just loved.

Our first discussion question sparked much conversation as did our final discussion question:

How did Mamah’s relationship with Ellen Key (the Swedish feminist whose work so profoundly influences Mamah) mirror – or differ- from hers with Frank Lloyd Wright?

Will write some of my general thoughts on this book later.

Loving Frank Discussion

One of my book clubs has just started its discussion of Nancy Horan’s Loving Frank, a fascinating piece of historical fiction that explores the love affair of Frank Lloyd Wright and Mamah Borthwick Cheney.

Here’s our first discussion question:

As the book begins, we see Mamah rushing to see Frank Lloyd W at a lecture. As she herself reflects, she “behaved like a madwoman, cranking the car until her arm ached, then racing on foot through snow and ice to get a glimpse of Frank, as if she had no choice.” She seems to act like a schoolgirl with a crush at first, but as their affair deepens how would you characterize her actions? Was she being self-indulgent or was it honest self-realization?

Will write more later.

Loving Frank discussion questions

I’m enjoying Nancy Horan’s historical novel Loving Frank.

Since I’m reading this for a book club, I’ve looked up some discussion questions as usual. 

Here are some discussion questions courtesy of Random House:

  1. Do you think that Mamah is right to leave her husband and children in order to pursue her personal growth and the relationship with Frank Lloyd Wright? Is she being selfish to put her own happiness and fulfillment first?
  2. Why do you think the author, Nancy Horan, gave her novel the title Loving Frank? Does this title work against the feminist message of the novel? Is there a feminist message?
  3. Do you think that a woman today who made the choices that Mamah makes would receive a more sympathetic or understanding hearing from the media and the general public? 
  4. If Mamah were alive today, would she be satisfied with the progress women have achieved or would she believe there was still a long way to go?
  5. In Sonnet 116, Shakespeare writes, “Let me not to the marriage of true minds/Admit impediments. Love is not love/That alters where it alteration finds. . . .” How does the relationship of Mamah and Frank bear out the sentiments of Shakespeare’s sonnet? What other famous love matches fill the bill?
  6. Is Mamah’s story relevant to the women of today?
  7. Is Frank Lloyd Wright an admirable figure in this novel? Would it change your opinion of him to know that he married twice more in his life? 
  8. What about Edwin Cheney, Mamah’s husband? Did he behave as you might have expected after learning of the affair between his wife and Wright?
  9. Edwin’s philosophy of life and love might be summed up in the following words from the novel: “Tell her happiness is just practice. If she acted happy, she would be happy.” Do you agree or disagree with this philosophy?
  10. “Carved over Wright’s fireplace in his Oak Park home are the words “Life is Truth.” What do you think these words mean, and do Frank and Mamah live up to them?
  11. Why do you think Horan chose to give her novel the epigraph from Goethe, “One lives but once in the world.”?
  12. When Mamah confesses her affair to her friend Mattie, Mattie demands, “What about duty? What about honor?” Discuss some of the different meanings that characters in the novel attach to these two words.
  13. In analyzing the failure of the women’s movement to make more progress, Mamah says, “Yet women are part of the problem. We plan dinner parties and make flowers out of crepe paper. Too many of us make small lives for ourselves.” Was this a valid criticism at the time, and is it one today? 
  14. Why does seeing a performance of the opera Mefistofele affect Mamah so strongly? 
  15. “Why is Mamah’s friendship with Else Lasker Schuler important in the book?”
  16. Ellen Key, the Swedish feminist whose work so profoundly influences Mamah, states at one point, “The very legitimate right of a free love can never be acceptable if it is enjoyed at the expense of maternal love.” Do you agree?
  17. Another of Ellen Key’s beliefs was that motherhood should be recompensed by the state. Do you think an idea like this could ever catch on in America? Why or why not? 
  18. Is there anything that Frank and Mamah could have done differently after their return to America that would have ameliorated the harsh welcome they received from the press? Have things changed very much in that regard today?
  19. What part did racism play in Julian Carleton’s crime? Were his actions the product of pure insanity, or was he goaded into violence? 
Back to reading. 

Loving Frank by Nancy Horan

One of my book clubs has just selected Loving Frank by Nancy Horan as our next selection. 

I first heard about this from a New York Times article titled “Notes on a Scandal” by Liesl Schillinger published September 27, 2007. This historical novel sounded intriguing then and I’m happy to have an excuse to read it.

Loving Frank is a novel about Frank Lloyd Wright and Mamah Borthwick Cheney — an educated woman who scandalized Chicago when she left her husband and two young children to flee to Europe with Wright (who left behind a wife and six children of his own).  Their love affair, in the early years of the 20th century, was a scandal in Chicago society and beyond, wherever Wright’s name was known.

Click here to read an excerpt of the first chapter.